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“I think of art, at its most significant, as a DEW line, a Distant Early Warning system that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it.” — Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media, 1964

How is Artificial Intelligence Changing and Challenging the Art Market?

Verisart presents ‘Art in the Age of AI’ exhibition and auction at Founders Forum in London

By Lindsey Bourret

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(Left) a small dog laying on a skateboard by Alexander Reben, 2018, oil painting on linen canvas, 25.6 x 25.6 in., unique work. (Right) Neural Colour by Matt DesLauriers, 2019, archival inkjet print on paper, 48 x 48 in., unique work.
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Rage of the Machine, a tragedy of tensors & Inferno Canto III by Helena Sarin, 2019, diptych print, archival ink on archival matte paper, 310 gsm, 14 x 14 in. (x2), edition of 3 + 2 APs.
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(Left) Imposture Series: Going to Standby by Mario Klingemann, courtesy of Onkaos, 2017, Papel Hahnemühle Museum Etching 350 gsm, 34.4 x 23.6 in., edition of 1 + 1 AP. (Right) Winter Woods (Learning Nature b57c.6688.4) by David Young, 2018, archival inkjet print, 27 x 36 in., edition of 3 + 1 AP.

But is it really art?

The current AI exhibition at The Barbican Centre in London, Pierre Huyghe’s UUmwelt exhibition at The Serpentine Gallery, Ian Cheng’s computer-simulated ‘living environments’ at the Venice Biennale this year and recent ground-breaking sales of AI art at Christie’s and Sotheby’s have thrust AI into the art market and questioned how we think about and interact with art.

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Artefact 1 by Sougwen Chung, 2019, archival ink on Hahnemuhle German etching paper, 25 x 20 in., edition of 5 + 2 APs.
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(Left) Untitled film still 3.1 / 3.2 by Casey Reas, 2019, diptych of dye-sublimation image on aluminum, 16 x 16 in. (x2), unique work. (Right) Untitled #342 by Ahmed Algammal, 2019, aluminum dibond, 48 x 48 in., edition of 25.

What role does authenticity play in a rapidly changing art world?

In his essay titled “Authenticity in Art,” published in the Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics, Denis Dutton defines and categorizes authenticity. Nominal authenticity includes the “correct identification of the origins, authorship or provenance of an object.” He writes, “Establishing nominal authenticity serves purposes more important than maintaining the market value of an art object: it enables us to understand the practice and history of art as an intelligible history of the expression of values, beliefs, and ideas, both for artists and their audiences.”

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Verisart Certificates of Authenticity

Shedding light on the world of art & collectibles

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